Bitcoin network

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A diagram of a bitcoin transfer

The bitcoin network is a peer-to-peer payment network that operates on a cryptographic protocol. Users send and receive bitcoins, the units of currency, by broadcasting digitally signed messages to the network using bitcoin cryptocurrency wallet software. Transactions are recorded into a distributed, replicated public database known as the blockchain, with consensus achieved by a proof-of-work system called mining. The protocol was designed in 2008 and released in 2009 as open source software by Satoshi Nakamoto, the name or pseudonym of the original developer/developer group.

The network requires minimal structure to share transactions. An ad hoc decentralized network of volunteers is sufficient. Messages are broadcast on a best effort basis, and nodes can leave and rejoin the network at will. Upon reconnection, a node downloads and verifies new blocks from other nodes to complete its local copy of the blockchain.[1][2]

Transactions[edit]

An actual bitcoin transaction including the fee from a webbased cryptocurrency exchange to a hardware wallet.

The best chain     consists of the longest series of transaction records from the genesis block      to the current block or record. Orphaned records     exist outside of the best chain.

A bitcoin is defined by a sequence of digitally signed transactions that began with the bitcoin’s creation, as a block reward. The owner of a bitcoin transfers it by digitally signing it over to the next owner using a bitcoin transaction, much like endorsing a traditional bank check. A payee can examine each previous transaction to verify the chain of ownership. Unlike traditional check endorsements, bitcoin transactions are irreversible, which eliminates risk of chargeback fraud.[3]

Although it is possible to handle bitcoins individually, it would be unwieldy to require a separate transaction for every bitcoin in a transaction. Transactions are therefore allowed to contain multiple inputs and outputs,[4][better source needed] allowing bitcoins to be split and combined. Common transactions will have either a single input from a larger previous transaction or multiple inputs combining smaller amounts, and one or two outputs: one for the payment, and one returning the change, if any, to the sender. Any difference between the total input and output amounts of a transaction goes to miners as a transaction fee.[1]

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fintechcryptocurrencymining

Financial Technological Networker , developing Crypto Currency Mining enthusiast , here in an African Continent !! A participant in various FinTech Platforms Local and Globally !!

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