Bitcoin Malware Lesson 8

Malware stealing[edit]

Some malware can steal private keys for bitcoin wallets allowing the bitcoins themselves to be stolen. The most common type searches computers for cryptocurrency wallets to upload to a remote server where they can be cracked and their coins stolen.[55] Many of these also log keystrokes to record passwords, often avoiding the need to crack the keys.[55] A different approach detects when a bitcoin address is copied to a clipboard and quickly replaces it with a different address, tricking people into sending bitcoins to the wrong address.[56] This method is effective because bitcoin transactions are irreversible.[57]:57

One virus, spread through the Pony botnet, was reported in February 2014 to have stolen up to $220,000 in cryptocurrencies including bitcoins from 85 wallets.[58] Security company Trustwave, which tracked the malware, reports that its latest version was able to steal 30 types of digital currency.[59]

A type of Mac malware active in August 2013, Bitvanity posed as a vanity wallet address generator and stole addresses and private keys from other bitcoin client software.[60] A different trojan for macOS, called CoinThief was reported in February 2014 to be responsible for multiple bitcoin thefts.[60] The software was hidden in versions of some cryptocurrency apps on Download.com and MacUpdate.[60]

Ransomware[edit]

Many types of ransomware demand payment in bitcoin.[61][62] One program called CryptoLocker, typically spread through legitimate-looking email attachments, encrypts the hard drive of an infected computer, then displays a countdown timer and demands a ransom in bitcoin, to decrypt it.[63] Massachusetts police said they paid a 2 bitcoin ransom in November 2013, worth more than $1,300 at the time, to decrypt one of their hard drives.[64] Bitcoin was used as the ransom medium in the WannaCry ransomware.[65] One ransomware variant disables internet access and demands credit card information to restore it, while secretly mining bitcoins.[63]

Unauthorized mining[edit]

In June 2011, Symantec warned about the possibility that botnets could mine covertly for bitcoins.[66] Malware used the parallel processing capabilities of GPUs built into many modern video cards.[67] Although the average PC with an integrated graphics processor is virtually useless for bitcoin mining, tens of thousands of PCs laden with mining malware could produce some results.[68]

In mid-August 2011, bitcoin mining botnets were detected,[69] and less than three months later, bitcoin mining trojans had infected Mac OS X.[70]

In April 2013, electronic sports organization E-Sports Entertainment was accused of hijacking 14,000 computers to mine bitcoins; the company later settled the case with the State of New Jersey.[71]

German police arrested two people in December 2013 who customized existing botnet software to perform bitcoin mining, which police said had been used to mine at least $950,000 worth of bitcoins.[72]

For four days in December 2013 and January 2014, Yahoo! Europe hosted an ad containing bitcoin mining malware that infected an estimated two million computers.[73] The software, called Sefnit, was first detected in mid-2013 and has been bundled with many software packages. Microsoft has been removing the malware through its Microsoft Security Essentials and other security software.[74]

Several reports of employees or students using university or research computers to mine bitcoins have been published.[75]

Money laundering[edit]

Bitcoins may not be ideal for money laundering, because all transactions are public.[76] Authorities, including the European Banking Authority[77] the FBI,[30] and the Financial Action Task Force of the G7[78] have expressed concerns that bitcoin may be used for money laundering. In early 2014, an operator of a U.S. bitcoin exchange, Charlie Shrem, was arrested for money laundering.[79] Subsequently, he was sentenced to two years in prison for “aiding and abetting an unlicensed money transmitting business”.[48] A report by UK’s Treasury and Home Office named “UK national risk assessment of money laundering and terrorist financing” (2015 October) found that, of the twelve methods examined in the report, bitcoin carries the lowest risk of being used for money laundering, with the most common money laundering method being the banks.[80]

Ponzi scheme[edit]

In a Ponzi scheme that utilized bitcoins, The Bitcoin Savings and Trust promised investors up to 7 percent weekly interest, and raised at least 700,000 bitcoins from 2011 to 2012.[81] In July 2013 the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission charged the company and its founder in 2013 “with defrauding investors in a Ponzi scheme involving bitcoin”.[81] In September 2014 the judge fined Bitcoin Savings & Trust and its owner $40 million for operating a bitcoin Ponzi scheme.[82]

Theft[edit]

There have been many cases of bitcoin theft.[83] One way this is accomplished involves a third party accessing the private key to a victim’s bitcoin address,[84] or of an online wallet.[85] If the private key is stolen, all the bitcoins from the compromised address can be transferred. In that case, the network does not have any provisions to identify the thief, block further transactions of those stolen bitcoins, or return them to the legitimate owner.[86]

Theft also occurs at sites where bitcoins are used to purchase illicit goods. In late November 2013, an estimated $100 million in bitcoins were allegedly stolen from the online illicit goods marketplace Sheep Marketplace, which immediately closed.[87] Users tracked the coins as they were processed and converted to cash, but no funds were recovered and no culprits identified.[87] A different black market, Silk Road 2, stated that during a February 2014 hack, bitcoins valued at $2.7 million were taken from escrow accounts.[51]

Sites where users exchange bitcoins for cash or store them in “wallets” are also targets for theft. Inputs.io, an Australian wallet service, was hacked twice in October 2013 and lost more than $1 million in bitcoins.[88] In late February 2014 Mt. Gox, one of the largest virtual currency exchanges, filed for bankruptcy in Tokyo amid reports that bitcoins worth $350 million had been stolen.[89] Flexcoin, a bitcoin storage specialist based in Alberta, Canada, shut down on March 2014 after saying it discovered a theft of about $650,000 in bitcoins.[90]Poloniex, a digital currency exchange, reported on March 2014 that it lost bitcoins valued at around $50,000.[91] In January 2015 UK-based bitstamp, the third busiest bitcoin exchange globally, was hacked and $5 million in bitcoins were stolen.[92] February 2015 saw a Chinese exchange named BTER lose bitcoins worth nearly $2 million to hackers.[93]

A major bitcoin exchange, Bitfinex, was hacked and nearly 120,000 bitcoins (around $60m) was stolen in 2016. Bitfinex was forced to suspend its trading. The theft is the second largest bitcoin heist ever, dwarfed only by Mt. Gox theft in 2014. According to Forbes, “All of Bitfinex’s customers,… will stand to lose money. The company has announced a haircut of 36.067% across the board.”[94]

Thefts have raised safety concerns. Charles Hayter, founder of digital currency comparison website CryptoCompare said, “It’s a reminder of the fragility of the infrastructure in such a nascent industry.”[95] According to the hearing of U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Small Business in April 2, 2014, “these vendors lack regulatory oversight, minimum capital standards and don’t provide consumer protection against loss or theft.”[96]

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fintechcryptocurrencymining

Financial Technological Networker , developing Crypto Currency Mining enthusiast , here in an African Continent !! A participant in various FinTech Platforms Local and Globally !!

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